Antarctica Ice Station Rescue – Horizon special on BBC June 7 – Halley VI could sink

Antarctica Ice Station Rescue
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Antarctica Ice Station Rescue – the BBC’s Horizon has been out there to see how the mission is going.

Britain’s state-of-the-art Antarctic research base Halley VI is in trouble. Built on the Brunt Ice Shelf, it sits atop a massive slab of ice that extends far beyond the Antarctic shoreline. But the ice is breaking apart and just 6km from the station is a ginormous crevasse.  It is threatening to separate Halley from the rest of the continent, setting the £28 million base adrift on a massive iceberg.

So Halley needs to move. But this is probably the toughest moving job on Earth and the team of 90 who have been tasked with the mission aren’t just architectural or engineering experts. They are plumbers, mechanics and farmers from across the UK and beyond – ordinary men and women on an extraordinary adventure. Their practical skills will be what makes or breaks this move. The rescue mission has one thing in its favour: Halley was built on giant skis that mean it can be moved – in theory. But no one has actually done it before. Embedded with the team was BBC filmmaker Natalie Hewit.  She spent three months living on the ice, following these everyday heroes as they battle in the most extreme environment on Earth to move this vital polar research station.

So do they manage to stabilise the base and set it in motion so it can continue its work.

This special Horizon programme will be broadcast Wednesday 7 June 9pm and can be watched on iPlayer soon after.

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